Easy Tangerine Marmalade Recipe

This easy tangerine marmalade recipe can be made with or without the peel, as you like. I guess it becomes tangerine jam if you opt to make it without the peels? In any case, fans of marmalade can enjoy this recipe all year long when you preserve this recipe with an easy water bath canning method.

Read all about the process of canning jams and jellies here.

jar of tangerine marmalade, open and some spread on bread

Since our tangerine tree is loaded every year with a crop that we can’t eat fast enough, I’m always looking for a way to preserve some of that citrusy flavor. Of course there’s my salted citrus, but I wanted something a bit sweet in the pantry, too.

This tangerine marmalade is good with butter on toast, but also as a pantry staple for baking or to flavor chicken dishes.


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Easy tangerine marmalade recipe

This recipe is a punched up version of marmalade, and includes some additions not usually found in marmalade. This recipe will be more like a tangerine jam — and somewhat less bitter — if you opt to leave out the citrus skins.

whole tangerines in a white bowl from above

Ingredients

Tangerines I have a tangerine tree that produces prolifically in my backyard, so that’s what I use for this recipe. Any sort of tangerine will work, though. Those popular little Cuties? Totally fine. Opt for ripe fruit without any bruised or rotten spots. Use just the fruit, if you’re aiming for tangerine jam, or include the orange part of the peels for a marmalade.

Tangerine juice — Use a manual juicer or an electric juicer to make your own juice. Alternatively, you could use orange juice.

Sugar — Use your favorite brand of granulated cane sugar. I prefer organic. 

Pectin This recipe is made using Pomona’s Universal Pectin. This is the only pectin I use anymore as it allows me to use much less sweetener. The standard pectin brands use an obscene amount of sugar in my opinion, often requiring equal amounts of sugar and fruit! ‘

Ginger Use fresh ginger or dried and powdered; either one works.

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Vanilla I use my homemade vanilla extract for this recipe, but store bought is certainly fine! 

How to Make Tangerine Marmalade

First you’ll need to determine if you want to use peels in the final product. If so, use a fruit peeler to remove just the zest — the orange part — of the peel from about 5 tangerines. Avoid the white pith, as this causes excessive bitterness. 

white plate full of peeled tangerines.

Peel the tangerines, again removing as much of the white pith and membranes as possible. Once peeled, slice the fruit in half to reveal the seeds. Remove as many seeds as possible, but know that you’ll still likely find a few floating in the fruit mixture as you’re cooking it! (Use a spoon to lift those out.)

tangerine cut in half to reveal seeds

Chop the fruit by hand, use a food processor to pulse it into a pulp, or use an immersion blender as the mixture is cooking. 

Cooking the Marmalade

Start by measuring out the tangerine sections. You’ll need about 30 tangerines to make enough pulp for this recipe. Heat the fruit in a large pot along with the tangerine juice, ginger, and calcium water. 

Combine the pectin with the sugar, making sure it’s thoroughly combined. 

When the tangerine mixture boils, add the sugar to the mix, stirring for a minute or two to assure that the pectin is well distributed. When the mixture returns to a boil, remove from heat and stir in the vanilla.

Note: The Hawaii Master Food Preservers suggest a pH of 4.2 or lower in the tropics. In other regions, the recommended pH is 4.6.

This recipe measured at a pH of about 3.0, putting it well into the “safe” zone for water bath canning. 

jars of canned tangerine marmalade recipe with fresh tangerines and a flower blossom

Related: Easy Canning Recipes for the Novice Home Canner

Canning this Tangerine Marmalade Recipe

You’ll need special canning jars, lids, and rings (read more about canning equipment here) to make this mango jam shelf-stable, but the process isn’t difficult.

Once the jars are filled, you’ll process them in a water bath. What this means is you’ll put the filled and sealed jars of jam into boiling water and heat them for ten minutes. This assures that the jars will seal well.

Hot tip: Boil some extra water in a saucepan or electric kettle as you’re working. If you need to top off the water in the canner, you won’t cool down the water too much.

Remove the jars to a towel-covered countertop and allow to cool fully. As they cool, you’ll hear the little “tink” sound of the jars sealing. Store any unsealed jars in the fridge and use those first. (This is unusual, but it does happen once in awhile.)

Remove the ring from each sealed jar, rinse to remove any jam residue, and store (without the ring) in the pantry.

Related: Easy Canning Recipes for the Novice Home Canner

bread on a white plate, spread with marmalade, open jar next to it

 

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jar of tangerine marmalade, open and some spread on bread

Easy Tangerine Marmalade Recipe

Yield: 8 - 1/2 pint jars
Prep Time: 35 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Processing Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

This tangerine marmalade recipe becomes more of a tangerine marmalade jam when you leave out the orange zest.

Ingredients

  • 6 cups tangerine segments, peeled and membranes removed (30-35 tangerines)
  • 1/2 cup tangerine zest, cut into slivers (about 5 tangerines), optional
  • 3 cups tangerine juice
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger or juice from a 2" piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon calcium water (from Pomona's pectin)
  • 3 cups granulated sugar
  • 4-1/2 teaspoons pectin (from Pomona's pectin)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Instructions

PREP FOR CANNING

  1. Fill a canning pot with water, set the lid in place, and heat on high heat until boiling. It can take awhile for the water to come to a boil, so get it started before you begin making the jam.
  2. Gather the jars you'll use, making sure each is clean and free of nicks in the rim, which could impede sealing.
  3. Bring a small pot of water to a simmer and turn off the heat. Drop the rings and lids into the water and leave them there until you're ready to screw them onto the filled jars.

MAKE THE CALCIUM WATER

  1. Combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (from the small packet in the box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small jar.
  2. Screw on a lid and shake until well-combined. You'll have more than you need for this recipe.
  3. Store the excess in the refrigerator for use in making additional jam or jelly recipes.

MAKE THE TANGERINE MARMALADE

  1. Chop the fruit by hand or use a food processor to pulse it into a pulp. Alternatively you can start with the tangerine sections and use an immersion blender as the mixture is cooking. 
  2. Measure the tangerines, tangerine juice, ginger, and calcium water into a large saucepan; bring to a boil.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the sugar with the pectin until it's thoroughly combined.
  4. When the tangerine mixture comes to a boil, stir in the pectin and sweetener, stirring vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve the pectin while bringing the jam back to a boil.
  5. Remove from heat when the marmalade boils.

CANNING THE MARMALADE

  1. Ladle hot marmalade into quarter-pint, half-pint, or pint sized jars, leaving 1/4" head space. A canning funnel makes this easy.
  2. Wipe jar rims to remove any jam that may have spilled. A clean rim is essential to a good seal.
  3. Set jar lids in place. Screw bands on finger tight.
  4. Use a jar lifter to gently submerge jars into hot water in the canning pot. Water should cover the top of the jars by an inch. The water will cool somewhat in reaction to the addition of the jars. Return the water to a simmer and then set the timer.
  5. Process for 10 minutes 0-1,000 feet altitude; add another minute for every additional 1,000 feet in elevation.
  6. Remove jars from water using the jar lifter and transfer to a solid, towel-covered surface. Allow to cool for 24 hours.
  7. Check seals. Lids should be solid and pulled down tight. (if they flex and pop, the jar didn’t seal; put unsealed jars in the refrigerator and use those first).
  8. Remove rings and wash outsides of jars. Store in a cool, dry place.

Notes

This recipe will be more like a tangerine jam — and somewhat less bitter — if you opt to leave out the citrus skins.

To use the peels, use a fruit peeler to remove just the zest — the orange part — of the peel from about 5 tangerines. Avoid the white pith, as this causes excessive bitterness. 

To prepare the tangerines, peel and remove as much of the white pith and membranes as possible. Once peeled, slice the fruit in half to reveal the seeds. Remove as many seeds as possible, but know that you’ll still likely find a few floating in the fruit mixture as you’re cooking it! (Use a spoon to lift those out.)

This recipe measured at a pH of about 3.0, putting it well into the “safe” zone for water bath canning. The Hawaii Master Food Preservers suggest a pH of 4.2 or lower in the tropics. In other regions, the recommended pH is 4.6.

Hot tip: Boil some extra water in a saucepan or electric kettle as you’re working. If you need to top off the water in the canner, you won’t cool down the water too much.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 128 Serving Size: 1 tablespoon
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 28Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 2mgCarbohydrates: 7gFiber: 0gSugar: 7gProtein: 0g

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slices of bread with tangerine marmalade

Originally published January 2012; this post has been updated.

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About the author: Kris Bordessa is an award-winning National Geographic author and a certified Master Food Preserver. If you want to send Kris a quick message, you can get in touch here.

15 comments… add one
  • Lemongrass Jan 17, 2021 @ 13:10

    I love marmalade but hardly ever buy it. Last year I made some grapefruit and guava marmalade. So happens in the Caribbean they both are plentiful during this time of the year. I enjoyed the combination. Never thought they went well together. I left out the pectin. Next time I make it will have to add ginger, as I grow my own ginger.

  • Susan Hayes May 4, 2020 @ 5:20

    I made this with some frozen mandarin juice I had from last season’s crop. Used 3 cups juice & 2 cups sugar and 1&1/2 TBLSP powdered low sugar pectin. Mixed 1/4 cup of sugar with pectin and added it to boiling juice. Brought it to full rolling boil and dumped the rest of the sugar in. Boiled it hard for 1 min. Took it off the stove and added 1 tsp vanilla. Processed for 10 min. Took 24 hours to “set.” It’s gorgeous.

    • Kris Bordessa May 4, 2020 @ 8:30

      Thanks for sharing your method!

  • Michelle Mar 24, 2018 @ 21:58

    Easy to make and yummy too.

  • Judy Feb 3, 2017 @ 15:12

    Had anyone actually tried this ??

  • jeanine barone Jan 29, 2012 @ 20:53

    I love anything citrusy, including marmalade. And adding ginger would be a real plus for me.

  • [email protected] Food. Stories. Jan 26, 2012 @ 15:59

    Even though I love most citrusy things, I too hate marmalade – and it’s because of the pith, just like it is for you. Glad to know I’m not alone!

  • MyKidsEatSquid Jan 25, 2012 @ 17:50

    I like the idea of the ginger in there too. Have you thought of using almond extract instead of vanilla? You wouldn’t use as much, but it might tone down the bitterness too.

  • merr Jan 24, 2012 @ 8:40

    This sounds really great.

  • Roxanne @ Champion of My Heart Jan 23, 2012 @ 13:53

    This looks awesome. I’ve made marmalade from scratch, and it’s NOT easy.

  • Alisa Bowman Jan 23, 2012 @ 10:25

    Thanks for the great recipe!

  • Sheryl Jan 22, 2012 @ 15:48

    How nice to have your pick of tree-fresh tangerines. Love them, and I’m sure the jam tastes yummy.

  • Jane Boursaw Jan 22, 2012 @ 14:52

    Love tangerines – creative way to work them into a jam.

  • Alexandra Jan 22, 2012 @ 13:55

    This sounds marvelous. I enjoy you having all those tangerines in your neighbor’s yard!

  • sarah henry Jan 22, 2012 @ 5:34

    Like the flavor pairing, says this jam girl. Anything I need to know (or special) about Pomona pectin?

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