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Easy Sourdough Starter Recipe for Making Sourdough Bread Without Yeast

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Baking sourdough bread is easy and delicious. This easy sourdough starter is the perfect place to begin with your sourdough baking and it requires no yeast! All you’ll need is some flour and water to get going with this sourdough starter recipe; the surrounding environment will do the rest as the mixture ferments thanks to wild yeast. Follow the guidelines below for how to make sourdough starter from scratch.

Use this sourdough starter to make up a batch of herb and parmesan English muffins.

Contributed by Shannon Stonger.

French bread and rolls in a bakery

Sourdough baking is as old as bread baking itself.

Before the widespread manufacturing of commercial yeast, nearly all rural bread bakers would have utilized either a sourdough starter or a natural leavening from beer brewing or other sources to make sourdough bread and baked goods. These natural leavening agents have many advantages over the commercial yeast breads but the primary one is the time and fermentation lacking with modern yeast usage.

Naturally leavened breads take time to achieve loft and during that time the bread is imbued with organic acids, the grains are broken down into more digestible constituents, and the sourdough bread is given really delicious flavor.

Sourdough starter recipe without yeast

All that is needed to create your own homemade leavening is flour and water. Many starters are available commercially and can work but I love the simplicity of catching these wild organisms in my own kitchen.

One of the most important things to keep in mind when beginning to delve into sourdough bread baking is that if your starter isn’t working well, your bread will be disappointing. Creating a large yeast colony alongside the prolific bacterial colony is critical to well-risen loaves.

Choosing the right flours for your sourdough starter recipe — or switching flours — is important. Understanding the needs of a sourdough starter and how it can be cared for daily or less frequently are helpful.

Everything you need to know about baking with natural leavening, including other forms of homemade yeast and gluten-free sourdough baking, can be found in Shannon’s book, Traditionally Fermented Foods.
sourdough starter in a glass measuring cup with red lettering

How to make sourdough starter from scratch

Feeding sourdough starter may sound complicated at first, but once you get into the rhythm of it, it’s a snap. These instructions will get you rolling. This is a no yeast recipe — that flour and water will be bubbly and beautiful in just a week, ready to make a crusty loaf of bread. Note that the temperature in your kitchen will impact the speed at which your starter ferments initially. If yours isn’t quite as active as you’d like by the end of the week, continue feeding the starter as on day 7.

Be sure to use unchlorinated water for making your starter, as chlorine can inhibit the formation of a yeast colony. If you’re using municipal tap water, you can solve this problem by allowing the water to sit uncovered overnight so the chlorine can dissipate.

Sourdough starter recipe, day 1: Combine a half cup of flour with a scant half cup of water. Stir vigorously to incorporate air. Cover with a breathable lid and allow to sit in a warm space for 12 hours. Repeat feeding with same quantities of flour and water.  [No discarding of starter required.]

sourdough starter in a glass measuring cup with red lettering

Related: Sourdough Banana Nut Muffins

Sourdough starter recipe, days 2 & 3: Continue feeding starter as above at the same 12 hour intervals. By the third day a bit of life should show up. There should be bubbles. A sour smell will begin to be evident. [No discarding of starter required.]

sourdough starter in a glass measuring cup with red lettering

Related: Simple Sourdough Boule Bread Recipe

On discarding

If we keep feeding a sourdough starter day after day, the container would eventually overflow. For this reason, beginning on day FOUR, you’ll discard all but one-half cup of starter. You can use this discarded starter in various recipes so it doesn’t go to waste. (There are plenty of good uses for “discarded starter” in the Grains chapter of Shannon’s book.) The remaining portion of starter, with its growing wild yeast colony, will be combined with fresh flour and water in a “feeding” and the fermentation process will continue.

Sourdough starter recipe, days 4, 5, & 6: Continue feeding starter as above, but discard all but 1/2 cup of the starter just before you feed it.

You should now see and smell signs of sourdough. More bubbles are forming, the starter is growing in volume in between feedings, etc.

sourdough starter in a glass measuring cup with red lettering

Time for homemade bread!

Sourdough starter recipe, day 7: Your starter should now be very airy when it hits its peak, 4-8 hours after a feed. Continue feeding as on days 4-6 and feel free to start baking! You have successfully made this easy sourdough starter without yeast — your starter is ready for action.

The care and keeping of a yeast-free sourdough starter

Continue to feed once per day going forward, if the starter sits at room temperature. Alternatively, you can store it in a refrigerator and remove to bake with it once per week. Just be sure to remove it 24 hours before mixing up your dough so you can feed it and let it come to room temperature.

When you’re ready to bake, these Simple Overnight Sourdough Rolls are an easy first sourdough recipe. Not ready to tackle sourdough baking quite yet? Try this pillowy soft potato bread recipe!

bubbly sourdough starter

★ Did you make this sourdough starter recipe? Don’t forget to give it a star rating below! ★

French bread and rolls in a bakery

Basic Sourdough Starter Without Yeast

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes

Sourdough bread starts with a good sourdough starter. This sourdough starter without yeast captures wild bacteria.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unbleached organic all-purpose flour, plus more for feeding
  • 1/2 cup filtered or distilled water, (scant)

Instructions

  1. Day 1: Combine a half cup of flour with a scant half cup of water. Stir vigorously to incorporate air. Cover with a breathable lid and allow to sit in a warm space for 12 hours. Repeat feeding with same quantities of flour and water.
  2. Days 2 & 3: Continue feeding starter as above at the same 12 hour intervals. By the third day a bit of life should show up. There should be bubbles. A sour smell will begin to be evident.
  3. Days 4, 5, & 6: Continue feeding starter as above, but discard all but 1/2 cup of the starter just before you feed it. (There are plenty of good uses for "discarded starter" in the Grains chapter of my book.) You should now see and smell signs of sourdough. More bubbles are forming, the starter is growing in volume in between feedings, etc.
  4. Day 7: Your starter should now be very airy when it hits its peak, 4-8 hours after a feed. Continue feeding as on days 4-6 and feel free to start baking! You have successfully made this easy sourdough recipe without yeast.
  5. Continue to feed once per day going forward, if the starter sits at room temperature and you wish to maintain an active starter for regular baking.
  6. Alternatively, if you won't be using the starter regularly, store it in the refrigerator and remove to bake with it as you need it. Just be sure to remove it 24 hours before mixing up your dough.

Reactivating a dormant sourdough starter

  1. To reactivate an inactive starter, remove it from the refrigerator, feed it with 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup water, and allow to sit at room temperature. Maintain it as noted in step 5 above.

Notes

Chlorine in municipal water can impact the making of a yeast colony. If you're using tap water, allow it to sit out overnight -- uncovered -- so that the chlorine can dissipate. 

On discarding: If we keep feeding a sourdough starter day after day, the container would eventually overflow. For this reason, beginning on day FOUR, you'll discard all but one-half cup of starter. You can use this discarded starter in various recipes so it doesn't go to waste. (There are plenty of good uses for "discarded starter" in the Grains chapter of Shannon's book.) The remaining portion of starter, with its growing wild yeast colony, will be combined with fresh flour and water in a "feeding" and the fermentation process will continue.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 1 grams
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 56Unsaturated Fat: 0gSodium: 1mgCarbohydrates: 11gProtein: 1g

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Sourdough starter FAQs

How often should I feed my starter?

In its infancy, while you’re collecting that wild bacteria from your kitchen, you’ll feed it twice a day. About every 12 hours. The easiest way to manage this is to do it morning and night. Once the starter is a week old and actively bubbling, you only need to feed active sourdough starters once a day.

Do you need to feed your starter every day forevermore?

Absolutely not! If you’re not maintaining at at room temperature and actively using it, you can refrigerate the starter and it needs no care during this time.

Why do I need to discard? 

If you want to keep an active starter on hand, you need to feed it once per day after the initial 7-day infancy of the starter. If you don’t bake with an active starter, but keep feeding it, your starter will eventually overflow the jar! The discarding of a portion of the starter simply prevents this. If you’ve got room in your jar, by all means, skip this step.

Is the discard useful for other recipes?

Yes! You can stir that discard into pancake batter, muffins, waffles, and biscuits. It takes a little practice to get a feel for how to incorporate the right amount of starter. If you aren’t ready to wing it, search the internet for sourdough discard recipes.

Originally published in June 2017; this post has been updated.

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Meet the Author

Shannon Stonger

Shannon Stonger is the founder of the blog Nourishing Days, where she shares her family's journey towards sustainability. She is the author of The Doable Off-Grid Homestead, Traditionally Fermented Foods, and the sourdough baking book 100% Rye. She holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry and lives with her husband, five children, and various farm animals on their five-acre homestead in Texas.

79 comments… add one
  • Sandra Jul 21, 2017, 2:12 am

    I have been baking a great bread with freshly ground wheat berries and would like to start using sourdough starter in the place of the yeast. Since the recipe makes 5 loaves at a time, how do I make sure I have enough starter when it comes time to make bread. I only bake about once a month as I keep the extras in the freezer and there are only 2 adults in my home.

    By the way, I purchased your book, Traditionally Fermented Foods and I love the ferments I’ve tried using your recipes. Thanks

  • Aubrey Aug 2, 2017, 6:45 am

    Do you have a schedule for using your sourdough starter? I’m curious how you use it regularly. In the past, I just make pancakes or bread when I feel like it, but inevitable I kill my starter or it gets infected with bad mold. Do you do something like…Every Saturday make English muffins or bagels (make extras to freeze?), Tuesdays bake loaf of bread, Thursdays make another item like muffins or tortillas? How often does one need to use their sourdough if they want to leave it sit out on the counter every day? I’ve seen some people that keep a nice big healthy jar on their counters and seeing it makes me feel happy. I would love to have that at home! One more question…do you have a favorite jar to keep your starter in long term? I put mine in my 1-quart Pyrex measuring bowl to start with, but long term I’ll need that back.

    • Marie May 7, 2020, 3:34 pm

      I really like your comment and would love a routine idea as well
      Just to clarify please
      If I keep my starter on the bench top:
      I need to feed it every 24h
      Everytime you feed it, you need to only keep 1/2 cup of the starter and add 1/2cup of flour and water?
      So, you either way throw what you remove or cook with it straight away?

  • Sheila Stephenson Aug 21, 2017, 10:45 am

    Can you use rice or coconut flour or another gluten free flour to make this starter?

    • Kris Bordessa Aug 23, 2017, 7:15 am

      You can experiment. I’ve not tried it personally.

  • Priscilla Dec 29, 2017, 6:36 am

    I thought we’re suppose to discard sone each time we feed ?? No?? I’m totally co fused .

  • Andreea Mar 7, 2018, 8:37 am

    Hello,
    I have started to prepare it but didn’t feed it for about 3 times , so in total 36 h, is any chance I can still continue or just release it ?

    Thank you
    Andreea

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 24, 2018, 1:30 pm

      I just saw this! How did it go?

  • Fran Apr 9, 2018, 8:25 pm

    Be warned: If it’s warm, this may overflow the jar. Good idea to set it in a baking dish just in case!

  • Sherri Quesnel Aug 31, 2018, 5:23 am

    Hi, just curious. For days 4-6 it says to discard it all except for half a cup before you feed it. Is that for every 12 hour interval for those three days, or just at the first feeding on day 4? I’m on day 3 right bow so want to be sure I am doing this correctly! Thanks!

    • Kris Bordessa Sep 7, 2018, 7:38 am

      Shoot, I’m just seeing this. I trust you worked it out?? Discard when you feed.

  • Patricia Oct 14, 2018, 1:06 am

    Hi, what do you mean feed it? Does it mean that everyday I need to add half cup of flour n water to the existing dough?

    • Kris Bordessa Oct 17, 2018, 9:28 am

      “Feeding it” is when you add the “fresh” flour/water to the starter.

  • Julien P. Nov 3, 2018, 10:40 am

    If I refrigerate my starter, how long can I go without feeding it?

    • Kris Bordessa Nov 4, 2018, 6:02 pm

      About a month or so. You can also freeze it for longer term storage.

  • Elizabeth Nov 7, 2018, 2:37 pm

    I’m on day 3 of this new starter. I used organic unbleached all purpose flour. It’s healthy and looks like a sourdough starter but does not smell like one. A friend gave me some if hers last month; I made a great boule with it. The one from your recipe doesn’t smell right. Any ideas as to what’s going on?

    • Kris Bordessa Nov 11, 2018, 1:48 pm

      Give it a few more days!

  • Edith Jan 29, 2019, 1:58 pm

    Hi. I don’t want to discard anything. Do I have to keep feeding the not-discarded starter? Should I store it in the fridge already? It has 2 days old. Thanks, Edith

    • Kris Bordessa Jan 29, 2019, 2:54 pm

      I don’t blame you! You can use the “discarded” starter in all sorts of baked goods. Stir it into pancake batter, muffins, etc.

  • Dee Feb 11, 2019, 7:56 am

    What is the purpose of discarding part of the starter?

  • Lemongrass Feb 18, 2019, 2:41 pm

    The first time I tried making the starter, I did not want to discard half of it. So I started with 6 ozs on flour and water. After 6 days of adding 6 ozs of water and flour I had a beautiful and airy product. I made two loaves of bread and was happy with the result. This time I will use the discarded mixture to make some banana bread or pancakes. Thanks for the simple and well written recipe.

  • Johnnie Mar 11, 2019, 1:38 am

    Will it work just as good with Spelt Flour?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 15, 2019, 7:04 am

      I haven’t experimented with spelt flour, but in other recipes I’ve found spelt to be a fine 1:1 substitute.

  • Emily May 19, 2019, 1:15 pm

    Could anyone give me a good recipe for bread using this starter? Thanks

  • olivia Jun 3, 2019, 4:07 pm

    Hi Kris,

    Hoping to get your insight! I am on day 14 of feeding my starter twice daily, discarding half and feeding with either 50g water/50g flour or 100g water/100g flour. I went to bake my bread and it didn’t rise, I allowed it a full day in the warming drawer. My starter seems a little slower in activity than when I started, but is still bubbling and rising slightly when I feed. Any suggestions as to where I am going wrong? I’m just using robin hood homestyle white bread flour.

    Thanks!

    • Kris Bordessa Jun 5, 2019, 5:02 pm

      Sometimes it just takes awhile. A really bubbly starter is what you’re after. Like, it might overflow the jar, or double in size quickly. How’s your temperature? I struggle sometimes when it’s not warm here. Are you using tap water that might be heavy on chlorine?

  • Elizabeth Niblack-Sykes Jul 4, 2019, 7:48 am

    I have followed the instructions for a week, No bubbles, no nothing. Flour & water are separated out within an hour of “feeding”. It is in an open mason jar, the kitchen is 75 degrees. Should I start over?

    • Kris Bordessa Jul 11, 2019, 5:47 pm

      Sorry, I’m late to see this; maybe you’ve already started over, but your experience sounds off. It’s odd that it’s separating; that can happen later, but I’ve never seen it happen right away. If you didn’t already, try using filtered water?

  • Julie Jul 13, 2019, 3:15 pm

    Hi I’m on day 5 mine has separated ? I’m also confused about the discarded the starter, do I get rid of the starter in the jar ?? All but half of what’s in there ?

    • Kris Bordessa Aug 25, 2019, 12:39 pm

      I’m slow to respond to this; did you figure it out? Starter can separate, but usually “new” stuff does not. Discard all but 1/2 cup.

  • Jennifer Sep 3, 2019, 5:58 am

    How much flour and water do you have to do at each feeding if you don’t discard?

    • Kris Bordessa Sep 3, 2019, 8:08 am

      The discarding is essentially to avoid having a huge jug of sourdough. I’d *try using the same amount listed in the recipe.

  • pete Sep 3, 2019, 8:09 am

    can I use beer in place of the water

    • Kris Bordessa Sep 3, 2019, 8:11 am

      I’ve never tried this. Let me know if you do!

  • Monica Oct 7, 2019, 5:29 am

    Hi Kris,
    This is my 1st try at making sour dough starter and I’m at day seven and I made some buttermilk pancakes with some discard, the pancakes were pretty good.
    Question: are plastic and glass utensils and containers best to use for this process? I’ve been using a stainless steel measuring cup and spoon to stir. Are these metal items interfering with the process or causing any other problems I should be aware of?
    Thanks.

    • Kris Bordessa Oct 10, 2019, 4:33 pm

      The jury seems to be out on this. Some say don’t use stainless with the starter, others say it won’t hurt. I use my handy dandy wooden spoon.

      • Rosa Nov 12, 2019, 10:23 am

        I have made the starter for the first time, but I don’t have bubbles.
        it does smell and tastes sour, though. Good to use?

        • Kris Bordessa Nov 13, 2019, 7:23 am

          Well, it won’t hurt to add it to recipes, but you want it to really be active in order to give your recipes rise. Try feeding again and keeping the jar in a slightly warmer place than you have had it.

          • Kim Apr 6, 2020, 5:13 am

            Day 7 and I’ve followed instructions to a T but it’s not bubbling very much and only has a slight sour smell. I also only have a cup of starter left in my jar after discarding and then feeding. How much starter should I have by now? If I use the 2 cups the recipe calls for to make my bread I won’t have enough. I’m totally confused

          • Kris Bordessa Apr 12, 2020, 1:40 pm

            The weather can impact starters. If it’s cool, it may take longer.

            If you don’t bake with an active starter, but keep feeding it, your starter will eventually overflow the jar! The discarding of a portion of the starter simply prevents this. If you’ve got room in your jar, by all means, skip this step. 

  • Chellie Feb 29, 2020, 4:38 pm

    Can the discarded portions be frozen to use as other starters later?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 3, 2020, 8:06 am

      The discards can be used in recipes like muffins and pancakes. But yes, you can freeze it, too, for short periods of time.

  • Magdelize Vosloo Mar 9, 2020, 6:12 am

    Thank you so much for the sourdough starter, I am a first timer at this. I have used the discarded starter for the “Simple sourdough Boule bread. It looks like a success.

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 10, 2020, 5:36 pm

      So glad to hear it!

  • Steve S Mar 19, 2020, 7:45 am

    I have read that to change a standard recipe to become a sourdough recipe is to follow the starter recipe, ie equal amounts water and flour. If one uses 1 cup starter one has to take out 1/2 cup fluid and 1/2 flour from the standard recipe ingredients. If this is incorrect, what are the correct changes.

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:32 pm

      I’m sorry, I don’t know the answer to this question. Maybe someone else will chime in?

  • Nadine Singh Mar 21, 2020, 11:50 am

    Can other flour Or flour combinations besides wheat flour be used?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:31 pm

      Yes, but I have not experimented with them to the point of being comfortable telling you how to do it. Sorry!

  • Mary Smith Mar 22, 2020, 4:13 pm

    Can you use freshly ground whole wheat flour for the starter?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:25 pm

      I have not tried this, so take my suggestions with a grain of salt. I’d probably try using whole wheat for a *portion, but not the entire recipe.

  • Debora Mar 24, 2020, 6:17 am

    Will all purpose flour work instead of unbleached flour to make the starter?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:25 pm

      Absolutely.

  • Laura Mar 26, 2020, 10:32 pm

    Thanks for this recipe! I’m on day 4 and it’s bubbly but it doesn’t smell of anything at all? You also said breathable lid- is a kilner jar too sealed?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:28 pm

      I’m responding several days later — how is it now? If it’s cool in your house, it can take longer! Bubbly is good, though!

  • DIANE C GREEN Mar 28, 2020, 3:10 am

    I am just starting this. A half a cup of water and a half a cup of flour looks like dough, not watery like your picture for day 1. Is your picture what it is suppose to look like after 12 hours?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:30 pm

      If it’s dough-like, I’d consider adding a bit more filtered water.

  • Denis Mar 29, 2020, 9:26 am

    I have a white flour starter. Can I take 70g of starter and convert to whole wheat or Rye flour?

    If so would feeding be 70g of each flour and water?

    • Kris Bordessa Mar 29, 2020, 1:29 pm

      You can probably safely use *some whole wheat or rye, but note that I have not tried this.

  • Belinda Apr 6, 2020, 5:09 am

    The instructions are confusing to someone doing this the first time.
    On day 4-6 do you discard all but 1/2 a cup each 12 hours (so discard all but 1/2 cup x 12 times) or just the first time on day 4?

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 12, 2020, 1:41 pm

      If you don’t bake with an active starter, but keep feeding it, your starter will eventually overflow the jar! The discarding of a portion of the starter simply prevents this. If you’ve got room in your jar, by all means, skip this step. 

  • Charlene Apr 9, 2020, 2:22 pm

    I mixed the proper amounts of flour and water, then 12 hours later added the same amounts again. It is still day 1, as there are 24 hours in the day. Do I wait 24 hours or 12 hours? I don’t get it, do I only add the flour and water once a day, then wait 24 hours? Or do I do it every 12 hours and that would be 2 times in 24 hours?

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 12, 2020, 1:39 pm

      You will feed it two times per day.

  • gina Apr 11, 2020, 4:12 am

    After the starter is complete (after Day7), and you continue to feed it once a day, do you still discard everything but 1/2c when feeding? Or do you just use what you need as you need it? Thank You!

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 12, 2020, 1:24 pm

      If you’re not maintaining at at room temperature and actively using it, you can refrigerate the starter and it needs no care during this time. If you want to keep an active starter on hand, you need to feed it once per day after the initial 7-day infancy of the starter. If you don’t bake with an active starter, but keep feeding it, your starter will eventually overflow the jar! The discarding of a portion of the starter simply prevents this. If you’ve got room in your jar, by all means, skip this step. 

      • gina Apr 13, 2020, 3:27 am

        Thank you!

  • Patty Torr Apr 13, 2020, 3:59 am

    I am starting day 3. For clarification purposes, beginning on day 4, do I discard all but 1/2 cup EACH time before I feed it? In other words, am I discarding all but 1/2 cup twice daily starting on day 4? Sorry – I’ve read other responses but am just not sure if I reduce to 1/2 cup EACH time. Thank you!!!

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 18, 2020, 1:22 pm

      The reason for discarding is to prevent your jar from overflowing. If that’s not a concern, you don’t *have to discard.

  • Kim Apr 18, 2020, 2:54 am

    I am completely new to this and thinking about starting to work with sourdough. So this may be a obvious question but here it goes anyway …. I understand you only need to discard some of the starter so it doesn’t overflow your jar. If wanted to make some to share with others, during that first week or so when it is just staring out … can I just move the “discard” into another jar and treat that one the same way as the first?

    Then once it is established I assume I could do the following with the “discard” 1) actually use it to bake bread, etc. 2) store in the fridge so I have a back up starter on hand to take out and use when ready as you’ve indicated in other comments above (needs to come to room temp, etc) 3) put in freezer to have for future use when ready (also per you comments) ?

    I guess what I am asking is can one have multiple starters going that have all come from the “discard” (if don’t have time to bake with it at the time of “discard”? I understand the reason not to do that is a lot to juggle and keep track of, but wanting to make sure I understand correctly. As right now, not only is yeast hard to find but so is flour (and short on time!) So would be nice to be able to share the starter but also keep discard in fridge / freezer to use as needed and when there is time.

    THANK YOU!

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 28, 2020, 7:13 am

      Yes. Essentially divide it and treat both as a “new” starter.

  • Elizabeth Walters Apr 25, 2020, 3:03 am

    I am on day 7 and my starter is sour smelling and when I feed it, it does bubble afterword but at the end of 12hrs is not thicker or higher volume…may be thicker on top but still has a bit of a runny texture. I have no idea why it doesn’t look like your starter. Help!

    • Kris Bordessa Apr 28, 2020, 7:23 am

      Sometimes a new starter just needs a bit more time to get rolling! Keep feeding it!

  • Caliese Apr 25, 2020, 4:56 pm

    Hi, this is my first time trying this.im on a mission to learn to cook more naturally and garden, lol. I’m on day 6 and i have tiny bubbles all over the top, but it looks like it may be separating a tad between feedings, is this ok? T smells slightly sour, but im not noticing it swell like ppl have said. My house is set on 68 degrees, is that an issue? I’ve only discarded once and that’s sitting now prepping for pancakes.

  • Greeny May 13, 2020, 6:13 am

    this recipe doesn’t work, I just wasted whole bag of flour. 1/2 cup of flour every 12 hours? This is insane amount, in 8 days this is 2 lbs!!! Do you know how hard is to buy flour today because of covid19? I followed this recipe to the Z and it’s bad recipe. I checked different sources and first mistake is amount of flour to amount of water. Second mistake – day 2 and 3 you feed your starter every 24 hours not 12. Third mistake – once you start feeding it you don’t have to add 1/2 cup of flour anymore, you can use less, 3 tbsp is more than enough. Forth mistake – you don’t use breathable cover for your jar, just regular cover, but keep it loose. Fifth mistake – you need whole wheat flour for your starter, it’s a must, you can mix 50/50 whole wheat with all-purpose flour, but you can’t use only all-purpose flour. People please don’t waste your time on this recipe, it doesn’t work. Go somewhere else, check youtube where you can see how they do that. You are wasting your time here

  • Greeny May 14, 2020, 12:56 am

    Wasted flour trying this recipe. It doesn’t work. This is bad recipe. My previous comment was deleted. Not nice trying to keep high score on recipe that doesn’t deserve this.

    • Kris Bordessa May 21, 2020, 11:44 am

      Nope, not deleted. I just don’t have time to moderate comments on a daily basis. I’m sorry this didn’t work out for you.

  • Lynne Jun 12, 2020, 11:26 am

    I have celiac disease, so can’t ingest gluten. Any idea if I can make starter with gluten free flour? Thanks!

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