Easy Strawberry Cobbler Recipe

This strawberry cobbler recipe has a lot going for it: It’s delicious, it’s easy to make, and it’s gluten free. The masa flour topping is a perfect match for the flavor of strawberries. 

Be sure to try making a batch of dried strawberries while these berries are in season, too!

piece of strawberry cobbler on a white plate

Easy  Strawberry Cobbler Recipe

One of the best things about this strawberry cobbler is how easy it is to make. Or maybe one of the best things is how delicious it tastes with ice cream. Or maybe it’s the fact that it’s gluten free so everyone in the family can enjoy it. 

strawberry cobbler in a square pan from above, showing nicely browned crust

What is cobbler?

Cobbler is a simple dessert made fresh fruits topped with a biscuit-like crust. The crust recipe varies from kitchen to kitchen. This recipe calls for corn masa to give the crust a flavorful punch.

It can be decadent enough for dessert or wholesome enough for breakfast. (Hey, it’s fruit!) This healthy strawberry cobbler recipe leans towards the latter, but with a scoop of ice cream, is definitely a great end to a late spring meal.

Ingredients from above, bowl of strawberries prominent

Ingredients

  • Strawberries — June is the high point for strawberry season, but depending on your region, you may be able to find them locally earlier in spring and into summer. Track down ripe berries and opt for those that have been grown organically if you can. Strawberries are consistently listed as one of the “dirty dozen” highly sprayed produce crops. 
  • Can you use frozen strawberries? Sure you can. Thaw the berries completely and drain well. Because frozen strawberries have more moisture than fresh berries, the cobbler may have more juice at the bottom. If you like, you can stir 3-4 tablespoons of tapioca into the frozen berry mixture to help thicken the mixture further.
  • Masa flour Corn masa is made from nixtamalized corn and is used primarily for making tortillas, tamales, and more. Seek out organic corn masa flour for this strawberry cobbler recipe. Bob’s Red Mill offers this product. It’s often found in the Mexican food aisle.
  • Honey — This natural sweetener can be adjusted to suit the level of sweetness in the strawberries. If they’re quite sweet, you can get by with using less. 
  • Milk — Use your favorite type of milk, whole, low-fat, or skim. I you avoid dairy, any alternative nut milk will work.
  • Butter — Allow the butter to come to room temperature for easy mixing. I used salted butter; if you prefer unsalted, that will work fine. If you want to make this a dairy free strawberry cobbler, coconut oil is a suitable replacement.
  • Arrowroot starch Used as a thickener to be combined with the strawberries. 
  • Leavening — Baking powder gives the cornmeal crust a little lift.

Making this delicious strawberry cobbler

To make this easy dessert recipe, start with whole, fresh berries and smash them. That’s right — no need to slice them. Just use a fork to mash them up a bit. This will help to release the juices.

pats of butter in dry ingredients from above

The biscuit topping is a thick batter. You can stir it with a wooden spoon or mix it up with clean hands. You can also use a stand mixer if you have one.

Start by combining the dry ingredients for the biscuit dough, then mix the butter in. It’s easier if the butter is at room temperature. Mix until the butter is incorporated, then add milk to make a wet batter.

batter in a big measuring cup with a wooden spoon

Spoon the batter over the berries, spread it, and pop it in the oven to bake for 30-40 minutes or until the fruit is bubbling and the topping is golden and cooked through.

strawberry dessert with scoop of ice cream on a white plate

Allow to cool for at least 15 minutes before serving. Serve this strawberry cobbler warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for a summertime treat that can’t be beat. 

Storing leftover cobbler

If you have leftovers, cover the cobbler pan and refrigerate for several days. For longer storage, cover cooked cobbler tightly and freeze for two to three months. 

The topping may be somewhat soggy after being frozen, but you can resolve this issue by reheating it. Place frozen strawberry cobbler in a cold oven, turn the heat on the 350 degrees, and heat for about half an hour or until topping is crispy.

Do not place a frozen glass pan of cobbler into a hot oven, as the glass may shatter. 

fork with a bite of cobbler, plate with dessert in the background

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piece of strawberry cobbler on a white plate

Easy Strawberry Cobbler Recipe

Yield: 12
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

Gently sweetened with raw local honey and topped with an unusual corn masa biscuit crust, this strawberry cobbler is something special.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds strawberries, preferably organic
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup honey, depending on the sweetness of the strawberries
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot starch
  • 2 cups corn masa flour, preferably organic
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 cup cold butter or coconut oil, cut into pieces
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 2 1/4 cups milk, plant-based if desired

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 10x10", or similarly sized, pan or two smaller pie pans.
  2. Lightly smash strawberries, honey, and arrowroot flour together in a medium bowl using a fork. Be sure that all ingredients are well combined. Set aside while you prepare the topping.
  3. Prepare the topping by combining the masa flour, baking powder, and salt together in a medium bowl with a whisk. Cut the cold butter or coconut oil into the masa mixture using either a pastry cutter, a fork, or clean hands.
  4. Add the honey and milk and mix well until all of the flour is hydrated and all ingredients are homogenous. It will be a thick batter.
  5. Spoon large tablespoons of batter over the strawberries, spreading them out with the back of a fork. Continue to dollop batter in evenly spaced increments throughout the whole pan until all of the batter is used up.
  6. Place in the oven and bake for 30-40 minutes or until the fruit is bubbling and the topping is golden and cooked through. Allow to cool for at least 15 minutes before serving. 
  7. Serve with plain yogurt for breakfast or ice cream as a dessert.

Notes

Track down ripe berries and opt for those that have been grown organically if you can. Strawberries are consistently listed as one of the “dirty dozen” highly sprayed produce crops. 

Seek out organic corn masa flour for this strawberry cobbler recipe. Bob’s Red Mill offers this product.

Can you use frozen strawberries? Sure you can. Thaw the berries completely and drain well. Because frozen strawberries have more moisture than fresh berries, the cobbler may have more juice at the bottom. If you like, you can stir 3-4 tablespoons of tapioca into the frozen berry mixture to help thicken the mixture further.

Storing leftover cobbler

If you have leftovers, cover the cobbler pan and refrigerate for several days. For longer storage, cover cooked cobbler tightly and freeze for two to three months. 

The topping may be somewhat soggy after being frozen, but you can resolve this issue by reheating it. Place frozen strawberry cobbler in a cold oven, turn the heat on the 350 degrees, and heat for about half an hour or until topping is crispy.

Do not place a frozen glass pan of cobbler into a hot oven, as the glass may shatter. 

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 12 Serving Size: 2" square
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 232Total Fat: 9gSaturated Fat: 5gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 24mgSodium: 187mgCarbohydrates: 36gFiber: 1gSugar: 13gProtein: 2g

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This post was originally published in June, 2018, contributed by Shannon from Nourishing Days. The post has been entirely updated; Shannon’s recipe remains unchanged. 

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About the author: Kris Bordessa founded Attainable Sustainable as a resource for revitalizing vintage skills. Her book, Attainable Sustainable: The Lost Art of Self-Reliant Living (National Geographic) offers a collection of projects and recipes to help readers who are working their way to a more fulfilling DIY lifestyle. She’s a certified Master Food Preserver and longtime gardener who loves to turn the harvest into pantry staples.

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